Connecting to Everyday Life: Enhancing Mathematics in the Classroom

Mathematics is one of the hardest subjects to teach in basic education – not because of its content, but because of the challenge of making it meaningful to students. As a subject that is synonymous with numbers or formulas written on the board or in a textbook, students don't have much opportunity to connect them to their everyday realities. This is the reason why, as math teachers, it is important to demonstrate that Math is not an abstract field to be scared of, but rather a fascinating subject that is useful and can be applied to various aspects of daily life!

Because the value of Math goes beyond just reading and solving problems within the classroom, here are a few tips that you should have in mind so that you and your students can both learn from the experience of connecting it to the real world:

• Instead of using textbook-based problems that are disconnected with the students' experience, tickle their mind with real life problems that require useful skills outside the classroom. For example, you can make them financially-savvy by asking them to compute profit from a bakery sale nearby or having them project their savings for the week or the month using a calculator and their allowance.

• It is great if you can incorporate fun into your lessons by employing activities that break the typical and boring routine of lecture and answer. One good idea is to integrate your lesson with other subjects, such as connecting the day's weather with computing temperature conversions. If you want to add a little twist, make it a fun game and add a time-limit to make the students think fast while enjoying themselves.

• The sky is the limit when choosing which aspects of reality you want your students to explore using numbers and formulas! Sometimes, it need not be something that everyone is familiar with. Give them possible scenarios such as the following: as a salesman of a reputable cargo container sales company with a client shipping toys worldwide, compute how many toys can fit into a ten-feet cargo container and how much your client can save.

These are just a few tips for aspiring math teachers who want to make a difference in the classroom. It would also help if you and your students utilize the Internet in searching for ideas that will make learning math easier and more pleasurable. To make it even more challenging, visit sites such as Cargo Container Sales and try to connect it to your lesson plan in the most coherent way possible.

Loving Numbers But Losing My Eyesight

Beethoven is considered as one of the greatest classical musicians and composers ever. What made him really stand out among the greats is his composition of his latter symphonies without the use of his hearing. In a way, he saw music as he wrote it down for others to listen and appreciate. As a person who loves numbers and math, yet with failing eyesight, I know how that must feel, that you are doing your work without the use of one of the most important faculties needed in your job. In my case, I can write down the equations, but I would have to squint my eyes when I review them.

Checking and Grading Papers

A lot of people think that because I am a math teacher, my life is a lot easier. True, I do not have to read long essays but checking test papers wherein students have to show their solutions before arriving at the final answer is also difficult. You know how illegible some students write and this is one of the reasons that I have really resorted to the use of a magnifying lens whenever I check papers. This is inconvenient and slows down my process of grading and checking papers.

I’ve been teaching for a long time now and I started when grades had to be entered manually onto a ledger. I’ve also prepared lesson plans and created exams when a typewriter was considered the modern piece of equipment. Most of the time I wrote by hand, also wrote on the blackboard by hand until my hands ached and I could no longer breathe because of the chalk allergy. I have sacrificed the best part of my years to teach math to young students. You know what? I have loved every minute of it. Teachers were created to be selfless and giving – until everything starts to fail: your eyes, your back, your hands and so on.

After many years of doing things the old way, I had decided to do something good for myself. Two things actually. The first was getting a powerful laptop and learning how to do my lessons there. The second was consulting a very good ophthalmologist in Austin and listening to what he had to say about my eyes. It wasn’t very good, but I wasn’t a hopeless case either. I made a firm decision to do what was best for my eyes. I knew I wanted to spend the rest of my years teaching and I won’t be able to do that if I don’t go to a center for Lasik in Austin Texas and get surgery for my eyes.

My friends and family were very supportive of my decision and even organized a small pre-surgery party. I am happy to say that the procedure went quickly and with hardly any discomfort. It has been six months and I have never seen more clearly. There’s no discomfort of wearing contact lenses or the awkward and clumsy eyeglasses that keep slipping down your nose.

The only ones who are not 100 percent happy are my students. I can see them chatting all the way down the back of the class and I can also easily check if they skipped a step in the problem solving exam I gave.

Connecting to Everyday Life: Enhancing Mathematics in the Classroom

Mathematics is one of the hardest subjects to teach in basic education – not because of its content, but because of the challenge of making it meaningful to students. As a subject that is synonymous with numbers or formulas written on the board or in a textbook, students don't have much opportunity to connect them to their everyday realities. This is the reason why, as math teachers, it is important to demonstrate that Math is not an abstract field to be scared of, but rather a fascinating subject that is useful and can be applied to various aspects of daily life!

Because the value of Math goes beyond just reading and solving problems within the classroom, here are a few tips that you should have in mind so that you and your students can both learn from the experience of connecting it to the real world:

• Instead of using textbook-based problems that are disconnected with the students' experience, tickle their mind with real life problems that require useful skills outside the classroom. For example, you can make them financially-savvy by asking them to compute profit from a bakery sale nearby or having them project their savings for the week or the month using a calculator and their allowance.

• It is great if you can incorporate fun into your lessons by employing activities that break the typical and boring routine of lecture and answer. One good idea is to integrate your lesson with other subjects, such as connecting the day's weather with computing temperature conversions. If you want to add a little twist, make it a fun game and add a time-limit to make the students think fast while enjoying themselves.

• The sky is the limit when choosing which aspects of reality you want your students to explore using numbers and formulas! Sometimes, it need not be something that everyone is familiar with. Give them possible scenarios such as the following: as a salesman of a reputable cargo container sales company with a client shipping toys worldwide, compute how many toys can fit into a ten-feet cargo container and how much your client can save.

These are just a few tips for aspiring math teachers who want to make a difference in the classroom. It would also help if you and your students utilize the Internet in searching for ideas that will make learning math easier and more pleasurable. To make it even more challenging, visit sites such as Cargo Container Sales and try to connect it to your lesson plan in the most coherent way possible.

Connecting to Everyday Life: Enhancing Mathematics in the Classroom

Mathematics is one of the hardest subjects to teach in basic education – not because of its content, but because of the challenge of making it meaningful to students. As a subject that is synonymous with numbers or formulas written on the board or in a textbook, students don't have much opportunity to connect them to their everyday realities. This is the reason why, as math teachers, it is important to demonstrate that Math is not an abstract field to be scared of, but rather a fascinating subject that is useful and can be applied to various aspects of daily life!

Because the value of Math goes beyond just reading and solving problems within the classroom, here are a few tips that you should have in mind so that you and your students can both learn from the experience of connecting it to the real world:

• Instead of using textbook-based problems that are disconnected with the students' experience, tickle their mind with real life problems that require useful skills outside the classroom. For example, you can make them financially-savvy by asking them to compute profit from a bakery sale nearby or having them project their savings for the week or the month using a calculator and their allowance.

• It is great if you can incorporate fun into your lessons by employing activities that break the typical and boring routine of lecture and answer. One good idea is to integrate your lesson with other subjects, such as connecting the day's weather with computing temperature conversions. If you want to add a little twist, make it a fun game and add a time-limit to make the students think fast while enjoying themselves.

• The sky is the limit when choosing which aspects of reality you want your students to explore using numbers and formulas! Sometimes, it need not be something that everyone is familiar with. Give them possible scenarios such as the following: as a salesman of a reputable cargo container sales company with a client shipping toys worldwide, compute how many toys can fit into a ten-feet cargo container and how much your client can save.

These are just a few tips for aspiring math teachers who want to make a difference in the classroom. It would also help if you and your students utilize the Internet in searching for ideas that will make learning math easier and more pleasurable. To make it even more challenging, visit sites such as Cargo Container Sales and try to connect it to your lesson plan in the most coherent way possible.

Connecting to Everyday Life: Enhancing Mathematics in the Classroom

Mathematics is one of the hardest subjects to teach in basic education – not because of its content, but because of the challenge of making it meaningful to students. As a subject that is synonymous with numbers or formulas written on the board or in a textbook, students don't have much opportunity to connect them to their everyday realities. This is the reason why, as math teachers, it is important to demonstrate that Math is not an abstract field to be scared of, but rather a fascinating subject that is useful and can be applied to various aspects of daily life!

Because the value of Math goes beyond just reading and solving problems within the classroom, here are a few tips that you should have in mind so that you and your students can both learn from the experience of connecting it to the real world:

• Instead of using textbook-based problems that are disconnected with the students' experience, tickle their mind with real life problems that require useful skills outside the classroom. For example, you can make them financially-savvy by asking them to compute profit from a bakery sale nearby or having them project their savings for the week or the month using a calculator and their allowance.

• It is great if you can incorporate fun into your lessons by employing activities that break the typical and boring routine of lecture and answer. One good idea is to integrate your lesson with other subjects, such as connecting the day's weather with computing temperature conversions. If you want to add a little twist, make it a fun game and add a time-limit to make the students think fast while enjoying themselves.

• The sky is the limit when choosing which aspects of reality you want your students to explore using numbers and formulas! Sometimes, it need not be something that everyone is familiar with. Give them possible scenarios such as the following: as a salesman of a reputable cargo container sales company with a client shipping toys worldwide, compute how many toys can fit into a ten-feet cargo container and how much your client can save.

These are just a few tips for aspiring math teachers who want to make a difference in the classroom. It would also help if you and your students utilize the Internet in searching for ideas that will make learning math easier and more pleasurable. To make it even more challenging, visit sites such as Cargo Container Sales and try to connect it to your lesson plan in the most coherent way possible.

Connecting to Everyday Life: Enhancing Mathematics in the Classroom

Mathematics is one of the hardest subjects to teach in basic education – not because of its content, but because of the challenge of making it meaningful to students. As a subject that is synonymous with numbers or formulas written on the board or in a textbook, students don't have much opportunity to connect them to their everyday realities. This is the reason why, as math teachers, it is important to demonstrate that Math is not an abstract field to be scared of, but rather a fascinating subject that is useful and can be applied to various aspects of daily life!

Because the value of Math goes beyond just reading and solving problems within the classroom, here are a few tips that you should have in mind so that you and your students can both learn from the experience of connecting it to the real world:

• Instead of using textbook-based problems that are disconnected with the students' experience, tickle their mind with real life problems that require useful skills outside the classroom. For example, you can make them financially-savvy by asking them to compute profit from a bakery sale nearby or having them project their savings for the week or the month using a calculator and their allowance.

• It is great if you can incorporate fun into your lessons by employing activities that break the typical and boring routine of lecture and answer. One good idea is to integrate your lesson with other subjects, such as connecting the day's weather with computing temperature conversions. If you want to add a little twist, make it a fun game and add a time-limit to make the students think fast while enjoying themselves.

• The sky is the limit when choosing which aspects of reality you want your students to explore using numbers and formulas! Sometimes, it need not be something that everyone is familiar with. Give them possible scenarios such as the following: as a salesman of a reputable cargo container sales company with a client shipping toys worldwide, compute how many toys can fit into a ten-feet cargo container and how much your client can save.

These are just a few tips for aspiring math teachers who want to make a difference in the classroom. It would also help if you and your students utilize the Internet in searching for ideas that will make learning math easier and more pleasurable. To make it even more challenging, visit sites such as Cargo Container Sales and try to connect it to your lesson plan in the most coherent way possible.

Connecting to Everyday Life: Enhancing Mathematics in the Classroom

Mathematics is one of the hardest subjects to teach in basic education – not because of its content, but because of the challenge of making it meaningful to students. As a subject that is synonymous with numbers or formulas written on the board or in a textbook, students don't have much opportunity to connect them to their everyday realities. This is the reason why, as math teachers, it is important to demonstrate that Math is not an abstract field to be scared of, but rather a fascinating subject that is useful and can be applied to various aspects of daily life!

Because the value of Math goes beyond just reading and solving problems within the classroom, here are a few tips that you should have in mind so that you and your students can both learn from the experience of connecting it to the real world:

• Instead of using textbook-based problems that are disconnected with the students' experience, tickle their mind with real life problems that require useful skills outside the classroom. For example, you can make them financially-savvy by asking them to compute profit from a bakery sale nearby or having them project their savings for the week or the month using a calculator and their allowance.

• It is great if you can incorporate fun into your lessons by employing activities that break the typical and boring routine of lecture and answer. One good idea is to integrate your lesson with other subjects, such as connecting the day's weather with computing temperature conversions. If you want to add a little twist, make it a fun game and add a time-limit to make the students think fast while enjoying themselves.

• The sky is the limit when choosing which aspects of reality you want your students to explore using numbers and formulas! Sometimes, it need not be something that everyone is familiar with. Give them possible scenarios such as the following: as a salesman of a reputable cargo container sales company with a client shipping toys worldwide, compute how many toys can fit into a ten-feet cargo container and how much your client can save.

These are just a few tips for aspiring math teachers who want to make a difference in the classroom. It would also help if you and your students utilize the Internet in searching for ideas that will make learning math easier and more pleasurable. To make it even more challenging, visit sites such as Cargo Container Sales and try to connect it to your lesson plan in the most coherent way possible.

Connecting to Everyday Life: Enhancing Mathematics in the Classroom

Mathematics is one of the hardest subjects to teach in basic education – not because of its content, but because of the challenge of making it meaningful to students. As a subject that is synonymous with numbers or formulas written on the board or in a textbook, students don't have much opportunity to connect them to their everyday realities. This is the reason why, as math teachers, it is important to demonstrate that Math is not an abstract field to be scared of, but rather a fascinating subject that is useful and can be applied to various aspects of daily life!

Because the value of Math goes beyond just reading and solving problems within the classroom, here are a few tips that you should have in mind so that you and your students can both learn from the experience of connecting it to the real world:

• Instead of using textbook-based problems that are disconnected with the students' experience, tickle their mind with real life problems that require useful skills outside the classroom. For example, you can make them financially-savvy by asking them to compute profit from a bakery sale nearby or having them project their savings for the week or the month using a calculator and their allowance.

• It is great if you can incorporate fun into your lessons by employing activities that break the typical and boring routine of lecture and answer. One good idea is to integrate your lesson with other subjects, such as connecting the day's weather with computing temperature conversions. If you want to add a little twist, make it a fun game and add a time-limit to make the students think fast while enjoying themselves.

• The sky is the limit when choosing which aspects of reality you want your students to explore using numbers and formulas! Sometimes, it need not be something that everyone is familiar with. Give them possible scenarios such as the following: as a salesman of a reputable cargo container sales company with a client shipping toys worldwide, compute how many toys can fit into a ten-feet cargo container and how much your client can save.

These are just a few tips for aspiring math teachers who want to make a difference in the classroom. It would also help if you and your students utilize the Internet in searching for ideas that will make learning math easier and more pleasurable. To make it even more challenging, visit sites such as Cargo Container Sales and try to connect it to your lesson plan in the most coherent way possible.

Connecting to Everyday Life: Enhancing Mathematics in the Classroom

Mathematics is one of the hardest subjects to teach in basic education – not because of its content, but because of the challenge of making it meaningful to students. As a subject that is synonymous with numbers or formulas written on the board or in a textbook, students don't have much opportunity to connect them to their everyday realities. This is the reason why, as math teachers, it is important to demonstrate that Math is not an abstract field to be scared of, but rather a fascinating subject that is useful and can be applied to various aspects of daily life!

Because the value of Math goes beyond just reading and solving problems within the classroom, here are a few tips that you should have in mind so that you and your students can both learn from the experience of connecting it to the real world:

• Instead of using textbook-based problems that are disconnected with the students' experience, tickle their mind with real life problems that require useful skills outside the classroom. For example, you can make them financially-savvy by asking them to compute profit from a bakery sale nearby or having them project their savings for the week or the month using a calculator and their allowance.

• It is great if you can incorporate fun into your lessons by employing activities that break the typical and boring routine of lecture and answer. One good idea is to integrate your lesson with other subjects, such as connecting the day's weather with computing temperature conversions. If you want to add a little twist, make it a fun game and add a time-limit to make the students think fast while enjoying themselves.

• The sky is the limit when choosing which aspects of reality you want your students to explore using numbers and formulas! Sometimes, it need not be something that everyone is familiar with. Give them possible scenarios such as the following: as a salesman of a reputable cargo container sales company with a client shipping toys worldwide, compute how many toys can fit into a ten-feet cargo container and how much your client can save.

These are just a few tips for aspiring math teachers who want to make a difference in the classroom. It would also help if you and your students utilize the Internet in searching for ideas that will make learning math easier and more pleasurable. To make it even more challenging, visit sites such as Cargo Container Sales and try to connect it to your lesson plan in the most coherent way possible.

Connecting to Everyday Life: Enhancing Mathematics in the Classroom

Mathematics is one of the hardest subjects to teach in basic education – not because of its content, but because of the challenge of making it meaningful to students. As a subject that is synonymous with numbers or formulas written on the board or in a textbook, students don't have much opportunity to connect them to their everyday realities. This is the reason why, as math teachers, it is important to demonstrate that Math is not an abstract field to be scared of, but rather a fascinating subject that is useful and can be applied to various aspects of daily life!

Because the value of Math goes beyond just reading and solving problems within the classroom, here are a few tips that you should have in mind so that you and your students can both learn from the experience of connecting it to the real world:

• Instead of using textbook-based problems that are disconnected with the students' experience, tickle their mind with real life problems that require useful skills outside the classroom. For example, you can make them financially-savvy by asking them to compute profit from a bakery sale nearby or having them project their savings for the week or the month using a calculator and their allowance.

• It is great if you can incorporate fun into your lessons by employing activities that break the typical and boring routine of lecture and answer. One good idea is to integrate your lesson with other subjects, such as connecting the day's weather with computing temperature conversions. If you want to add a little twist, make it a fun game and add a time-limit to make the students think fast while enjoying themselves.

• The sky is the limit when choosing which aspects of reality you want your students to explore using numbers and formulas! Sometimes, it need not be something that everyone is familiar with. Give them possible scenarios such as the following: as a salesman of a reputable cargo container sales company with a client shipping toys worldwide, compute how many toys can fit into a ten-feet cargo container and how much your client can save.

These are just a few tips for aspiring math teachers who want to make a difference in the classroom. It would also help if you and your students utilize the Internet in searching for ideas that will make learning math easier and more pleasurable. To make it even more challenging, visit sites such as Cargo Container Sales and try to connect it to your lesson plan in the most coherent way possible.